The Invitation

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Picture Courtesy of Drafthouse Films

A dinner invitation is usually cause for celebration.  A time for friends and family to get together for a special occasion or simply to be near each other and share in one another’s company.  Normally a wholesome affair baring nothing sinister in its intentions; however things don’t always appear as they seem.

Will (Logan Marshall-Green) and his girlfriend (Emayatzy Corinealdi) have been invited to Will’s ex-wife’s house to have dinner with her new husband and their old friends in the place they used to share together.  As if this whole set up isn’t strange and confusing enough as it is, we continue. Will is struggling with the loss of his son and coming back to the house they raised him in brings back a whirlwind of emotions and memories.  What is even more difficult for Will is trying to cope with how easily his ex-wife has been able to put it behind her and move on.  Although their intentions seem innocent, Will believes there is something sinister going on and the audience experiences a suspense filled dinner party while trying to determine what is real and what is really going on.

As with most dinner parties with ulterior motives, I have welcomed you and offered you peasantries but lets move on to the agenda for the evening and get down to business.

FROM THIS POINT ON THIS REVIEW WILL BE FILLED WITH SPOILERS FOR THE SIMPLE REASON THAT I MUST INFORM YOU OF THE TRUTH TO SAVE YOUR TIME AND MONEY.

Not that I’m really surprised with the outcome of this film or my thoughts towards it, but I did notably place this film on the Movies NOT To See list.  I’m very open to trying and doing new things, but there is a difference between being stubborn or set in your ways and knowing when something is a complete waste of time.  I may have been advised that my placing the film on the NOT to see list may have been premature due to it’s overall positive rave reviews.  For those of you who know me, you will know how I feel about most review quotes promoting films.  Surely something must give when each film pumped out of the film business machine is raved to be the number one film?  What gets me even more than those review headlines are film festival films.  A film festival seems like a great time all around (which I would love to attend one in the future despite my preconceptions based on facts), but when these films receive so many awards from these random seemingly illustrious names I can’t help but group them all in the same boat.  I can’t recall a time when I saw a film festival film with a handful of awards be anything other than a pretentious waste of time.  In this respect, The Invitation does not disappoint.  What may be misconceived as a suspenseful build to an epic finale to those unfamiliar with film watching can be simply translated into a horribly awkward dinner party that never ends.  Once the predictable and shocking events begin to unfold the audience can finally wake from their well deserved snooze only to be treated to a fifteen minute attempt at horror and massacre.  When we clumsily make our way to the end of the film we are treated to one last surprise which most of us have already expected.

So please, feel free to attend this dinner party and try to stay awake while you can.  The light at the end of the tunnel is that your host will end you before their endless party ever will.

I don’t claim to be perfect and everyone is entitled to their own opinion, but it seems I am rather spot on with yet another one.

Cheers to pleasant warnings and please accept my advice and decline this invitation.

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